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Ross building, The Edmond J. Safra Campus. Picture: Dror Bar-Natan, Fall 2001
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Research  Computer Science & Engineering

The research directions of the CSE department span from the theoretical end, in which questions pertaining the foundations of computer science are explored, all the way to the more practical end, in which  actual construction of hardware and software are studied. In between, many of our research groups are interdisciplinary, and study the fascinating borderline between computer science and other scientific fields such as biology, physics, medicine and economy.

Research groups

 

Groups overview

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE  

How to get computers to work together, cooperate, share resources, and avoid conflict are the major areas that the School of Engineering Computer Science's Artificial Intelligence Group is focusing on. As the first ones in the field who applied principles from game theory to model protocols for computer agent cooperation, the Group helped established a formal framework governing the high-level behavior of interacting heterogenous computer systems.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Daniel Lehmann, Prof. Jeff Rosenschein

 

CLUSTER, GPU AND CLOUD HPC SYSTEMS
CLUSTER, GPU AND CLOUD HPC SYSTEMS  

This group is involved in experimental research and development of a management system targeted for High Performance Computing (HPC) on Linux clusters, multi-cluster, GPU clusters and Clouds. Areas of activities include algorithm for adaptive resource management, dynamic work distribution, scheduling, operating systems virtualization, gossip algorithms for information dissemination, management of clusters, GPGPU computing, HPC and parallel computing. The research performed in the laboratory has led to the development of the Multicomputer Operating System for UnIX (MOSIX), which can make Linux clusters, including GPU/APU clusters, run as a single computer with multiple processors/devices.

 

[Lab's page]

 

People: Prof. Amnon Barak

 

COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY
COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY  

As more bodies of data come to light in biology research, it has become eminently clear that our understanding of many of life's processes will emerge as a result of developing novel computational approaches. At the School of Engineering & Computer Science's new Computational Biology Croup experts in molecular biology, bioinformatics, combinatorics, computer theory, machine learning, protein structure, drug design, biophysics, computational structural biology, and statistics form a powerful body of investigators into life's genetic and molecular make-up.

 

[Lab's page]

 

People: Prof. Nir Friedman, Prof. Nati Linial, Prof. Naftali Tishby, Prof. Yair Weiss

 

COMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS
COMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS  

The explosive growth of the Internet has led to new challenges in the fields of e-commerce, e-Markets and cooperation between computing systems that belong to different organizations and different people. Challenges that are bringing together seemingly disparate disciplines and laying the foundations for a new integrated global market.

 

[Lab's page]

 

People: Prof. Daniel Lehmann, Prof. Noam Nisan, Prof. Jeff Rosenschein

 

COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY AND DESIGN
COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY AND DESIGN  

Representing and computing with geometric objects is of great scientific, technical and economic importance, and spans a broad spectrum of fields, such as Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM), Computer Vision, Robotics, and many applications.

Current research in Computational Geometry and Design includes:
  1. The development of an expressive and computationally efficient framework for reasoning about geometric uncertainties with dependencies and its applications.
  2. The development of the configuration space method for computer-aided kinematic design of mechanisms with changing contacts, including kinematic analysis, tolerancing, and synthesis.

 

[Lab's page]

 

People: Prof. Michel Bercovier, Prof. Leo Joskowicz, Prof. Michael Werman

 

COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE
COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE  

With the help of mathematical modeling and computer simulations, researchers at the Computational Neuroscience Group are getting a better 'handle' on understanding how information is encoded and processed by neural activity in the brain. At the crux of the matter is the Group's research on understanding how the brain extracts relevant information and is thereby able to decide upon a particular action to perform.

 

[Lab's page]

 

People: Prof. Daniel Lehmann, Prof. Naftali Tishby, Prof. Daphna Weinshall, Prof. Yair Weiss, Dr. Amir Globerson

 

COMPUTATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS
COMPUTATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS  

In recent years digital images become more and more abundant due to the rapid advantaces in the production of digital cameras. This new reality introduces many new scientific problems and possible applications aiming to exploit this media. In our labs we work on developing novel algorithms for a wide range of purposes and use tools from statistics and physics. In the Computer Graphics Lab research is being conducted in a number of different areas, including: efficient algorithms for the generation of high-fidelity realistic images of three-dimensional objects and virtual worlds, interactive visualization and transmission over the Internet of complex virtual worlds and new medical visualization techniques.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Dr. Raanan Fattal, Prof. Dani Lischinski, Prof. Shmeul Peleg, Prof. Mike Werman

 

COMPUTER-AIDED SURGERY
COMPUTER-AIDED SURGERY  

In the Computer-Aided Surgery and Medical Image Processing Laboratory at the Hebrew University's School of Engineering and Computer Science faculty and student teams are developing new algorithms and computer-based systems to improve the planning, execution, and evaluation of diagnostic and surgical procedures.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Leo Joskowicz, Prof. Dani Lischinski

 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
COMPUTER SYSTEMS  

Research activities in the Computer Systems laboratories span multiple areas: distributed systems, the future Internet, and performance evaluation. Work on distributed systems includes everything from theoretical foundations and distributed algorithms, through issues of reliability and availability, to the design and implementation of sensor networks and their protocols. We also perform research on near-term applications on mobile platforms such as cell phones, and long-range speculative research that will result in enhanced performance and optimal security for tomorrow's global information infrastructure. The hallmark of our work is a sound experimental approach, combining the collection of real-world data with careful measurements and workload analysis.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Danny Dolev, Prof. Dror Feitelson, Prof. Scott Kirkpatrick

 

COMPUTER VISION
COMPUTER VISION  

When people look around a room, they effortlessly perceive it as consisting of three dimensional objects and surfaces. But connect a camera to a computer and point it at the same room, and the computer will "see" a disconnected array of pixels. The Computer Vision Group at the School of Engineering & Computer Science is developing algorithms and methods that will allow computers to reach the remarkable performance of humans.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Shmeul Peleg, Prof. Amnon Shashua, Prof. Daphna Weinshal, Prof. Yair Weiss, Prof. Mike Werman

 

DATA BASES
DATA BASES  

The members of the Data Base Group at the School of Engineering & Computer Science focus their research efforts on subjects of information retrieval and extraction, information exchange and integration. Emphasis is on the current semi-structured data models, such as XML, that is fast becoming a de-facto standard for data exchange and data integration

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Catriel Beeri, Dr. Sarah Cohen, Prof. Eliezer Lozinski, Prof. Yehoshua Sagiv

 

MACHINE LEARNING
MACHINE LEARNING  

What is learnable and how can machines learn? How can we automatically find meaningful simplicity in the midst of disorderly complexity? The Machine Learning group at the School of Engineering and Computer Science deals with the theoretical foundations of learning, the design of novel learning algorithms, and with a garden variety of applications such as bioinformatics, computer vision, computational biophysics, information processing, and natural language processing.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Nir Friedman, Dr. Amir Globerson, Prof. Scott Kirkpatrick, Dr. Shai Shalev-Shwartz, Prof. Eli Shamir, Prof. Naftali Tishby, Prof. Yair Weiss

 

NATURAL LANGUAGE PROC. AND COMP. COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS
NATURAL LANGUAGE PROC. AND COMP. COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS  

Our Natural Language Processing and Computational Cognitive Linguistics group deals with algorithms that allow computers to 'understand' human languages and with models of the nature of such languages. This is an interdisciplinary field, combining methods and concepts from machine learning, AI, inference, linguistics, cognitive science, and psychology. The current research focus of the group is along two complementary directions, syntax (parsing and applications) and semantics (lexical and relational acquisition from huge corpora). We use both supervised and unsupervised learning method, with a preference for the latter. Among the applications we investigate are data mining, opinion discovery, information retrieval, search engines, and lexicography. In 2007 and 2008 the group was the first in the world in terms of number of publications in the leading prestigeous publication forum.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Ari Rappoprt

 

QUANTUM COMPUTING
QUANTUM COMPUTING  

Only a decade old, the exciting interdisciplinary field of quantum computation has already managed to shake the very axioms of theoretical computer science. The idea is fascinating: Quantum systems, governed by the peculiar laws of quantum mechanics, will be used as computational devices. Newly discovered quantum algorithms and cryptographic protocols give strong theoretical evidence that such computers, if built, will be incomparably more efficient than any other, "classical", computer. But to what extent and to what degree will these computers outperform standard 'traditional' computers is, as of now, a complete mystery.

 

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Prof. Dorit Aharonov, Prof. Michael Ben-Or, Prof. Naftali Tishby

 

SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING  

Computer-based numerical simulations are widely used in all branches of science and engineering. This allows to overcome the need for expensive experiments and allows to investigate hypothetical scenarios. Different types of equations require a different treatement specific to its unique nature. The art of deriving numerical scheme and algorithmic strategies in order to obtain a solution is the essence of scientific computing.

[Lab's page] [Seminar]

 

People: Dr. Raanan Fattal

 

SIGNAL PROCESSING & COMMUNICATION
SIGNAL PROCESSING & COMMUNICATION  

The group focuses on design and analysis of signal processing algorithms. Current applications include wireless communication systems, distributed networks and synthetic aperture radar. The group relies on modern developments in high dimensional statistical analysis and convex optimization methods and theory.

 

People: Dr. Ami Wiesel

 

THEORETICAL COMPUTER SCIENCE
THEORETICAL COMPUTER SCIENCE  

The mandate of Theoretical Computer Science is to explore the basic notion of computation, and discover its power and limitations, in a variety of models and settings. This research has revolutionized our understanding of computation and has deep scientific and philosophical consequences. Moreover, this research has been responsible for enormous technological progress.

 

[ Lab's page ] [ Seminar] [Quant. Comp. seminar]

 

People: Prof. Dorit Aharonov, Prof. Yair Bartal, Prof. Michael Ben-Or, Prof. Orna Kupferman, Prof. Nati Linial, Prof. Noam Nisan, Prof. Yuval Rabani, Prof. Michael Rabin, Prof. Alex Samorodnitsky, Prof. Eli Shamir, Dr. Guy Kindler

 

WIDEBAND RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
WIDEBAND RADIO COMMUNICATIONS  

Radio communication systems are prevalent in modern life for both audio and data. Future data networks are expected in wide bandwidths that enable fast communications.
It is often the case that there is no line of sight between the transmitting and receiving antennas. In these conditions the channel is characterized by a large number of paths between the transmitter and receiver, where each path is reflected/diffracted over objects such as furniture, people, vehicles and buildings. The signal transitted over each path takes a while to reach the receiver, it travels in the speed of light and bounces off differnet objects until finally hitting the receiver antenna. The distance the signal travels along one path can reach tens of meters even for paths that are confined to a single floor of one building. Thus, the delay of the paths can reach tens and even hundreds of nanoseconds.
There are many questions that arise in an attempt to understand the behavior of such complicated channels, and the experiments in the laboratory are intended to try ans answer some of them.
Another activity in the lab is testing ideas for system related to localization of the transmitter and objects in the environment of the system. Millimeter scale localization accuracy is possible in line of sight conditions, and decimeter to meter accuracies are possible without line of sight.

[Lab's page]

 

People: Dr. Dana Porrat